Finland

Finland is a Northern European nation bordering Sweden, Norway and Russia. Its capital, Helsinki, occupies a peninsula and surrounding islands in the Baltic Sea. Helsinki is home to the 18th-century sea fortress Suomenlinna, the fashionable Design District and diverse museums. The Northern Lights can be seen from the country's Arctic Lapland province, a vast wilderness with national parks and ski resorts.

  • Capital:Helsinki
  • Dailing Code:+358
  • Currency:Euro
  • Points of interest: Suomenlinna, Santa Claus Village
  • Official languages: Finnish, Swedish

Education in Finland

Education is one of the cornerstones of the Finnish welfare society. One of the basic principles of Finnish education is that all people must have equal access to high-quality education and training. The same educational opportunities should be available to all citizens irrespective of their ethnic origin, age, wealth or where they live. In Finland education is free at all levels from pre-primary to higher education.


Higher education is offered by universities and universities of applied sciences (UAS). Both sectors have their own profiles. Universities emphasize scientific research and instruction. Universities of applied sciences adopt a more practical approach.


At universities students can study for Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees and scientific or artistic postgraduate degrees, which are the Licentiate and the Doctorate degrees. In the two-cycle degree system students first complete the Bachelor’s degree, after which they may go for the Master’s degree. As a rule, students are admitted to study for the Master’s degree. The target time for taking a Master’s degree is generally 5 years. The average time for taking a Master’s degree in Finland is, however, six years. The policy-makers have introduced several measures to shorten graduation times and increase completion of studies, including personal study plans and financial incentives, for example.


Degree studies at universities of applied sciences give a higher education qualification and practical professional skills. They comprise Higher education with a dual structure 23 24 Finnish education in a nutshell core and professional studies, elective studies and a final project. All degree studies include practical on-the-job learning. The extent of degree studies in the universities of applied sciences is generally 210−240 ECTS credits, which means 3½ - 4 years of full-time study. It is further possible to take a UAS Master’s degree after acquiring a minimum of three years’ work experience. The UAS Master’s degree takes 1.5-2 years and is equivalent to a university Master’s degree.

Higher education

Danish higher education has a long tradition of combining academic excellence with innovative research and teaching. High academic standards, interdisciplinary studies and project‐based activities ensure active and motivating learning environments. Most Danish higher education institutions benefit from their co‐operation with business, industry and research institutes, creating an enriching and vibrant learning environment for their students. Danish higher education institutions offer a range of opportunities for international students. The institutions are highly international and offer a large number of programs taught in English. A recent survey with responses from more than 3,500 international students studying in Denmark showed that 78% of the students would recommend Denmark as a study destination and 93% consider Denmark to be a safe country to live in.

Cost:

Tution fees:

Finland is one of the financial havens of Europe since public universities do not charge tuition fees for students coming from EU/EEA countries.


Starting from autumn 2017, non-EU/EEA students will have to pay tuition fees. This will result in:

  •  Minimum tuition for English-taught degree: 1,500 EUR/year
  •  Average tuition fees English-taught: 10,000 – 16,000 EUR/year
  •  Finnish or Swedish-taught degrees: free of charge
  •  Highest tuition – University of Helsinki: 10,000 – 25,000 EUR/year
  •  One of the lowest tuition – University of Lappeenranta: average of 10,000 EUR/year

Living Expenses: The general cost of living is relatively high and the monthly living expenses for a student are approximately 700€ - 900€, depending on where you study. In the Helsinki metropolitan area and other larger cities costs are typically higher than in smaller cities.

Student union fees: As a university student, you are required to pay an annual student union fee, which is approximately 80-100€. Similar student unions also exist at the UAS’s (universities of applied sciences) but the membership is optional there. By joining your local student union, you get a student card which brings you many benefits!

Scholarships and grants for Finland

Due to the future tuition fees, all universities are required to have a scholarship programme for students from non-EU/EEA countries. Until this is implemented, only PhD students can apply for a scholarship.

  •  While scholarships for Bachelor students are basically unavailable, you may find programs that will help you finance your studies through Erasmus Mundus. The funded scholarships cover the participation costs, travel expenses, a living allowance and insurance.
  •  Non-EU/EEA students with great academic performance are eligible for having their tuition fully or partially waived. These scholarships are offered by the Finnish government and some also include a living cost allowance.
  •  Scholarship dedicated to American students in Finland provided by Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships program. Awards offered are up to 5,000 USD/year.

Admission

Bachelors Admissions:

English-taught Bachelor’s are mainly offered by the universities of applied sciences (UAS), however there are a few university Bachelor’s available in English too.

The individual universities/UAS's have their own scholarship programs for non-EU applicants subject to tuition fees; you usually apply for the scholarship at the same time when you apply for admission.

The main joint application period for Bachelor’s programs is in January annually, for studies commencing in autumn. Some Bachelor's may also have a January study start option. For these, you usually apply in September.

Some degree programs may also offer additional applications outside the main application period.

You start your online application process at Studyinfo.fi. There is no application fee charged in the national Studyinfo.fi application system.

If you are an eligible applicant, you may be required to partake in an entrance exam. These are usually held in Finland, but some options also exist for taking the exam abroad. Some Bachelor's degree program may offer you the alternative of applying with an SAT test score instead of a separate entrance exam. The Admissions Services of the university/UAS you are applying to can advise you in matters related to the entrance exams, or SAT test score requirements if applicable.

After the application period and the possible entrance exams are over, the university/UAS you have applied to processes your application and makes the final admission decisions. Results are usually announced by end of June at the latest.

If you are accepted as a student, you will get an official letter of admission from the university/UAS.

Masters Admissions:

English-taught Master’s are offered by both universities and UAS’s (universities of applied sciences). The UAS Master’s include a work experience requirement, as they are targeted for those already in the working life.

The individual universities/UAS's have their own scholarship programs for non-EU applicants subject to tuition fees; you usually apply for the scholarship at the same time when you apply for admission.

Most university Master's have their application periods open between late November/early December to mid/late January. UAS Master's may have their admissions later, in March. But since the application periods may vary from one program to another, always check these details for each Master’s separately.

You start your online application process at Studyinfo.fi. There is no application fee charged in the national Studyinfo.fi application system.

Some Master’s programs may require you to partake in an entrance exam. Check the entry requirements of the Master’s you’re interested in – if there will be an exam, the Admissions Services of the university/UAS can advise you further about it.

After the application period and the possible entrance exams are over, the university/UAS you have applied to processes your application and makes the final admission decisions. Results are usually announced by end of June at the latest.

If you are accepted as a student, you will get an official letter of admission from the university/UAS.

VISAS

You have to apply at the Finland Embassy or Consulate for Finland student visa or residence permit. Once you have received the official letter of acceptance for your intended course of study, you can check your eligibility for obtaining a Finnish student visa or residence permit and then go ahead with the procedure.

Remember that you will have to apply for student residence permit before you arrive in Finland.

Please note that even if you have submitted your application electronically, you will have to visit the Finland Embassy or Consulate nearest to you in order to verify your identity and to present the original copies of the documents needed for the application to be processed.

A Finnish student residence permit application cannot be processed until the applicant visits the embassy, regardless of whether the application has been submitted electronically or at the embassy itself.

Required Fees for Finland Residence Permit for Students

Fees for Finland Residence Permit for Studies (for application on paper) – EUR 330 (INR 25,525.60).

WORKING IN FINLAND

Working While Studying

Having a part-time job during your studies can give you valuable work experience which is one of the things employers tend to look for in graduates entering the labour market. Many higher education students work part-time, either in the evenings, or during weekends. Most also try to find a summer job for the months from June to late August.

It’s important to know that a part-time job can be hard to find, especially if you don’t speak the language. Therefore, you shouldn’t plan your finances solely on the possibility of finding employment. Also bear in mind that a salary from a part-time job would most likely not cover all of your living expenses.

Nordic or EU/EEA national:

You don’t need any permits for working during your studies. There are no restrictions as to how many hours per week you are allowed to work, just make sure that work doesn’t get in the way of your study progress.

Non-EU student:

You can work within certain limits on a student residence permit if the work is practical training included in your degree or if the amount of your part-time work does not exceed 25 hours a week. There are no limits in terms of hours on full-time work outside term times (summer and Christmas holidays specifically).

Your local employment office ('TE services') can also be a source of advice. There are some commercial recruitment agencies available too. Job vacancies are announced mainly through on-line services, but you can also find some job adverts in the newspapers. Also remember that not all job vacancies are publicly advertised - be actively in contact with potential employers, too.

Working after Graduation:

You can be prepared for the job hunt by pursuing work during your studies, for example having a part-time job in your field while still studying may act as a springboard to full-time employment upon graduation.

To help you get started, you should check what career-related student services your Finnish home university or UAS has on offer. They might for example arrange job fairs in cooperation with prospective employers, or organize job searching skills seminars and other information sessions. Contact them to learn more about what services they provide.

The general advice in the section Working during studies is also valid when it comes to seeking permanent employment after your studies, so please also refer to the advice found in that section.

As a non-EU student who has stayed in Finland on a student residence permit, you can apply for an extended residence permit for up to a year after your graduation to search for work. If you find employment, you can then of course apply for a new residence permit based on this employment.

Note that you need to apply for a residence permit for seeking work in Finland during the time your permit granted for studies is still valid.

PERMANENT RESIDENCE IN FINLAND

After you’ve resided on a 'continuous' basis for a certain time in Finland after your graduation, for example as an employed person, it is also possible to apply for permanent residence.

JOBS IN FINLAND

If your intention is to seek and find a job in Finland, it usually takes a residence permit which you get when you get a job, and this is given by the state. Salaries are between 3.000 and 8.000 Euros.

Average salary is between 4.000 and 4.500 Euros.

Work schedule in Finland must not go over 8 hours per day/40 hours a week.

Every employee has to have 35 hours of rest during the week, even if it means only Sunday. If you work on Sunday, you get 100% overtime.

Top 5 Popular Jobs in Finland

You don’t need any permits for working during your studies. There are no restrictions as to how many hours per week you are allowed to work, just make sure that work doesn’t get in the way of your study progress.

Teacher

Finnish top-ranking education system is well recognized worldwide. Finland is becoming an ideal destination for educators who are looking to push their intellectual and creative boundaries, as they can have the opportunity to experience the first hand education. Teachers in Finland enjoy high social status and can earn average slightly over 3,250 euros per month.

Nurse

The health care service in Finland is of a high standard, so as the nursing education. Healthcare is one sector where demand is greater than supply. Nurses in Finland earn average 3,000 euros per month.

Programmer

Finland is proud of its IT industry, from the glorious Nokia in telecommunication to Angry Bird the rising gaming field, it is beyond question an ideal place for those who are passionate about IT to study and work. As fortune.com reported, there are over 7,000 programmer jobs waiting to be filled in Finland, in order to meet the requirement of fast growing IT industry.

Kindergarten Teacher

Finland is well known for its best early education system in the world. The kids in Finnish day care center must be the most happiest compared to other countries, while teaching in kindergarten can also be an enjoyable job. With the development of internationalization, the demand of kindergarten teacher is increasing, especially English speaking teachers.

Accountant

There are thousands of accountants in Finland, with the number of startup companies rising, the demand of professional accountants will increase accordingly. Accountants in Finland can be paid over 4,000 euros per month.

SALARIES BY PROFESSION

  • C LEVEL EXECUTIVE
  • BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
  • ACCOUNTANT
  • PHYSICIAN
  • FINANCIAL ANALYST
  • DENTIST
  • PRODUCT MANAGER
  • MARKETING MANAGER
  • CIVIL ENGINEER
  • CHEMICAL ENGINEER
  • OPERATIONS MANAGER
  • UX DESIGNER
  • ATTORNEY
  • DATA ANALYST
  • LECTURER
  • IT MANAGER
  • QA ENGINEER
  • INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER
  • BUSINESS ANALYST
  • PROJECT MANAGER
  • DATA SCIENTIST
  • SOFTWARE ENGINEER
  • ACCOUNT MANAGER
  • ARCHITECT
  • WEB DESIGNER
  • RESEARCH SCIENTIST
  • SALES MANAGER
  • MECHANICAL ENGINEER
  • SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR
  • POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER
  • INTERIOR DESIGNER
  • WEB DEVELOPER
  • ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
  • FINANCE MANAGER
  • GRAPHIC DESIGNER
  • CONTENT MARKETING
  • MOBILE DEVELOPER
  • EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
  • HARDWARE ENGINEER
  • TEACHER
  • OFFICE MANAGER
  • COPYWRITER
  • PHARMACIST
  • CUSTOMER SUPPORT
  • CASHIER
  • NURSE
  • HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
  • CHEF
  • WAITER
  • RECEPTIONIST
  • ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
  • FASHION DESIGNER
  • $80,567
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  • $45,335
  • $45,117
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  • $40,249
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  • $36,806
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  • $35,253
  • $33,408
  • $33,052
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  • $32,544
  • $30,983
  • $30,675
  • $30,292
  • $27,933
  • $27,802
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  • $26,150
  • $25,432
  • $23,046
  • $21,998
  • $21,484
  • $20,451
  • $17,688